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THE POWER OF KNOWING YOUR ROOTS!

Modern DNA tests, in a field known as genetic genealogy, have proven to be a boon for adoptees. These relatively inexpensive tests can overcome sealed records, lies, and misinformation to identify birth families, measure ethnic ancestry, and uncover inherited health risks. For details on exactly what genetic genealogy can do for adoptees see our Benefits page.

Thousands of adoptees have already used these tests to uncover their biological roots…and reunions with birth families are happening daily. The main purpose of this site is to inform and educate adoptees and others about these tests and how to use them. The number of DNA tests offered online is growing rapidly. Yet only a few tests can really help. We will direct you to those specific tests on our How It Works page.

The DNA testing company that has done the most for adoptees is Family Tree DNA (FTDNA). We partnered with them to create a GAGP Group Project on their web site. The project provides discounts on certain tests and makes it easier for search angels to assist adoptees. For more information on FTDNA and the group project see our Family Tree DNA page.

Fortunately, a number of books, web sites, Facebook groups, and mailing lists already exist to provide education and inspiration, answer questions, and provide search assistance. Two groups even have some limited funds to pay for DNA testing in cases of financial need. Rather than reinvent the wheel, we will refer you to the best of these on our DNA Testing Resources page.

While prices for genetic genealogy tests have dropped significantly over the last few years to as low as $79, even that may be too expensive for some adoptees.  As a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt nonprofit organization in the United States, we are able to raise funds for the purpose of funding adoptee DNA tests. You can read more about this on our page for the Filling in the GAGP Fund.

NOTE: For simplicity we use the term adoptee. But these same DNA tests can also be used by anyone with an unknown father, children of sperm donors, and those with adopted parents or grandparents.